06.04.14

Do All Dogs (and Cats) go to Heaven?

Posted in Psychic Affairs at 3:29 pm by DorothyWelsh

Many people wonder if their beloved pet made it to the Rainbow Bridge; and if they can connect with you after they pass. Dogs, cats and every living thing (human, animals and even plants) have an energy field around them. We call it our Aura or Auric Field. When your pet passes, their bodies may expire, but their energy field lives on. And if it was a good relationship, they may want to stay with you. Their bodies are not able to stay, but their Aura may remain with you. And if you pay close attention, you may see, feel and hear signs of their presence.

Over the years, I have connected with many pets on the other side and brought through many messages of love and healing. Pets usually come through with love in their hearts for their human moms and dads, and will try to show you signs that they are still with you.

Some owners may still feel their pet jumping up on their lap. Many cat owners may feel their feline friends rubbing up against their legs, or even hear that beautiful Meow sound in the next room.
You may hear them walking around the house, or running around in the back yard. –You may hear their pitter patter on a hard-wood floor – or hear the sounds of their collar clanking against their metal ID tags. One woman reports the sounds of her pet coming through the doggie door after they have passed. And another of their pet scratching at the back door to be let in. “I can still hear him. I know he is still here.” reports Carolyn from Flemington.
Have you ever received a sign that your pet was still with you? Have you heard a sound or felt their presence? If so, I would love to hear from you. Please post your story below.

Can Pets Connect with us after they pass?
The answer is: Yes!

1 Comment »

  1. Rick Lutz said,

    August 18, 2014 at 6:30 am

    About six years ago, I was doing something in the kitchen and my dogs Curly and Candy were out in the yard barking. When they stopped, I heard a loud bang at the back door. When I went to investigate, I couldn’t open the door to the dining room, the door with the doggy door installed. Curly was laying motionless against it. I raced around through the front. When I got there, he appeared to be dead. I cried out his name a couple of times. That must have brought him back, because he lifted his head for a moment to look at me and then he did die. He expelled his waste as he died. I cleaned it and him up, and then I layed him on one of his blankets on the sofa (sectional). I had some heavy plywood so I began to build a casket for him. It was one of the hardest jobs I ever had until I dug his grave. I’d already buried several babies in the backyard, but this seemed to be the hardest and heaviest dirt I’d ever dug.

    When I finished the casket, I lined it with blankets, put a couple of his toys in it, put it on the sofa, and put Curly in it. Then I curled up in a ball in the center section. I felt like an elephant was standing on my chest. I think it was my first heart attack.

    My condition wasn’t lost on Curly’s spirit. He was the most empathetic dog I have ever seen. If you were hurting, he was hurting. He would put his paws on your shoulders, stick his head behind yours, and quite literally give you a hug. It was no surprise to me that he would come to me now. I dozed for an instant and he was beside me. I reached down to pet him. He was soft and warm, the Curly I knew. In an instant his body turned cold and hard and his fur coarse and stiff. I believe, and so does my wife, that Curly was telling me, “Daddy, this is how I was but this is how I am now. You have to let go.”

    I had one more direct encounter with his spirit. I was working on my computer and dozed for an instant. Curly was immediately under the desk, in a position his body could never have occupied. He had the saddest look on his face that I ever saw and he put his paw on my knee. There was no doubt he was repeating the “let go” message with emphasis.

    I had one more look at his body. I hadn’t sealed the casket because my wife had been on a trip to Branson with a woman she worked with and I didn’t know if she would want to see him first. When I lifted the lid, he was swollen and looked like a big puppy. I wasn’t going to let her see that, so I sealed it.

    When my wife got home, we had a couple of indirect contacts and I had one last indirect. We’d agreed that when Curly and Candy were gone, we weren’t getting anymore dogs. Losing them was too painful. Curly realized I needed someone to replace him.

    My wife was at work one day shortly after we buried him. I was watching TV, something I rarely do, when a brief piece on Pet Finders.org came on. I’d never heard of it before, but they work to transfer dogs from overcrowded shelters to less full. When my wife came home, she was carrying a paper that someone had left open to a story on adoptions. There wasn’t much doubt that Curly was telling us to fill the awful hole in our hearts. The clincher was yet another very brief dream in which a dark brown dog was jumping up at us in his/her cage in a shelter. Others were paying no attention to us. A voice said, “It’s Curly, but it’s not Curly.” This was the dog to fill the hole.

    We went to a shelter that said it had several old dogs for adoption, but when we got there they had none. A young, dark brown dog was jumping up at her cage asking us to take her with us. We had no choice. As I was completing the paperwork, some shelter people walked in with an old Norwegian Elkhound. They’d had him at an adoption day at Petsmart, but nobody wanted him. He looked so sad. Either he knew he would likely be put down or he wanted to be.
    He seemed tired of life. Lack of exercise and overweight left him swaybacked. His leg muscles and his ribs were sponge. There really was no muscle. We said we’d take him. The shelter people were going to tear up the paperwork on the other dog (Lucy) but we said, “No way.” she was that close to a pardon and release to a real home. We weren’t going to pull that out from under her.

    We were told the other dog would need his teeth cleaned. When we took him to the Vet we were told he would lose most of the teeth because the only things holding them in was plaque and infection. He also said he was older than we were told (8) because of the swayback. I told the Vet I thought that was because he had no muscle. I said when we got him in shape, most of that would likely go and it did. In the meantime, I was so worried about him that I began sleeping on the sofa so he wouldn’t try to go up the stairs. I was afraid that might kill him. Curly saw that the hole in my heart was now filled with concern for Buddy, so he went on to that field without care where he could play with my other babies that had gone on ahead of him.

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